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| Live from the Labs cnrs I international w 8 magazine Ptolemaic Figure Resurfaces w Although its height does not exceed 96 cm, its imposing demeanor and aura of mystery inspire awe and curiosity. A remnant of the Ptolemaic period (332-30 BC), this granodiorite fragment of a beautifully-crafted statue was recently uncovered at the Egyptian archeological site of Armant (ancient Hermonthis), south of Luxor. The discovery is part of a joint excavation campaign involving CNRS 1 and the French Institute of Oriental Archaeology (IFAO ) in Cairo. Launched in 2004, the initiative seeks to perform an architectural survey of the remains of the temple of Monthu, largely destroyed between the 4th and 6th centuries AD. Led by Christophe Thiers of the CFEET K,1 the project also focuses on the epigraphic analysis of the hieroglyphic inscriptions on the walls and Environment Sustainable Crop Production q This beautifullycrafted Ptolemaic statue was excavated at the Armant site (Egypt). From an agronomic perspective, silage maize provides the best water use efficiency, producing up to 1.3 grams of carbon per liter of water consumed, compared with 0.65 grams for winter wheat and 0.2 grams for sunflower. However, from an environmental point of view, winter wheat, which has a longer growing season and whose grain only is exported, captures more carbon in the soil, sequestering up to 1 gram of carbon per liter of water consumed. By contrast, sunflower and silage maize, which both have a shorter growing season, cause soil carbon impoverishment and thereby become net producers of greenhouse gases. These results could influence both cultural and consumer practices. Further studies using the same methodology will be conducted this summer as part of the EU-sponsored GHG-Europe project.3 In particular, researchers will analyze the effects on carbon, water, greenhouse gas budgets, and water use efficiency resulting from the use of crops like mustard and faba bean as plant cover between main plantations. 01. T. Tallec, et al. “Crops’ water use efficiencies in temperate climate: Comparison of stand, ecosystem and agronomical approaches.” Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 2013. 168: 69-81. 02. Centre d’études spatiales de la biosphère (CNRS / Université de Toulouse). 03. Greenhouse Gas Management in European Land Use Systems. BY Séverine Lemaire-Duparcq w The environmental impact of agricultural practices can be significantly reduced by cutting both water consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, as highlighted in a recent study1 by the CESBIO.2 Launched in 2005, the project set out to determine the carbon production and sequestration, as well as the water use efficiency of three major European crops: winter wheat, silage maize, and sunflower. The researchers selected two field plots in southwestern France (in the Gers and Haute-Garonne regions) and closely monitored their meteorological and agronomic conditions, measuring and recording factors such as CO2 and water fluxes, light levels, temperature, and soil water content. Most importantly, they developed an innovative way of calculating a given field’s carbon budget (including net CO2 flux, carbon import and export due to organic fertilization and harvest) per unit of water consumed by evaporation and/or transpiration. This index indicates the land’s environmental efficiency in terms of water use. q Set up in the middle of a silage maize field, the sensors of this flux tower monitor meteorological variables in real time. Contact information: CES BIO, Toulouse. Tiphaine Tallec > Tiphaine.tallec@cesbio.cnes.fr Eric Ceschia > Eric.ceschia@cesbio.cnes.fr Toulouse © E. Ceschi a © Cnrs -Cfeet k/Chr . Thiers


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