Page 29

CIM32

N°32 I quarterly I january 2014 In Images | 29 w occur during crystal growth causes irreversible stacking faults,” explains Alain Ibanez, who directs the institute’s “condensed matter, materials, and functions” department. “In order to perform delicate physics experiments on the fundamental properties of materials—optics, magnetism, superconductivity, and so on—we need to aim for zero defects.” The characteristics of the building, specially designed to keep any mechanical, electrical, acoustic, thermal, hygrometric, or magnetic disturbances to a minimum, make it unique in Europe. “The considerable improvement in our sensitivity thresholds and detection capabilities will make it possible to obtain 02 03 This scanning tunneling microscope (STM) analyzes the structural and electronic properties of graphene using the high resolution of a tungsten tip scanning its surface at a distance of less than 1 nanometer. 04 These graphene flowers were obtained by decomposition of methane on a copper surface. 05 06 In this room, the equipment makes it possible to create structures on sample surfaces with a resolution as small as 0.6 micrometers. Shown here is a direct-write photolithography system. 07 08 The synthesis of graphene on copper takes place in an oven heated to 1000°C. This is done by injecting a mixture of two reactive gases— methane and hydrogen—diluted in argon. 09 10 The building’s properties allow researchers to work on nanoelectric circuits with new functionalities, as shown here with this cryostat. 07 09 08 10 04 05 06 © photos : c.frésillon/CNRS Photothèque © Z. HAN 10 μm


CIM32
To see the actual publication please follow the link above