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N°33 I quarterly I April 2014 CNRS Networks | Horizons 33 w Laureate Meetings Council, and the Lindau Nobel prizewinners Foundation to enable young researchers from French units to attend the yearly event. Germany today is the preferred destination for CNRS researchers, with 6204 visits in 2012, accounting for 11% of all CNRS foreign missions. A host of joint ventures also illustrate the links between Germany and the CNRS. Outstanding collaborations with the MPG include the European Laboratory for Frequency Comb Spectroscopy, created in 2009, which developed a recordbreaking spectrometer for ultrasensitive gas spectroscopy. Another example is the Grenoble-based IRAM,2 the international research institute for radio astronomy, created in 1979 and regarded as the world leader in the field. Two newly-launched LIAs with the Leibniz Institutes, focused respectively on catalysis for sustainable chemistry, and on microbiology and immunobiology, testify to the continuing collaborative effort between French and German laboratories. Another product of this bilateral cooperation, the CNRS-German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) Plate Boundary Observatory in Chile, created in early 2013, aims to make better use of IPOC3 data, as well as facilitate student and researcher exchanges. Social sciences are another important research area between the two countries, celebrated with the inauguration of the Berlin-based Marc Bloch Centre in 1994. Closely linked to universities, it is dedicated to all fields of social sciences, including history, geography, political science, and sociology. Sponsored by the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the French and German Ministries for Higher Education and Research, and the CNRS, one of its priorities is training and education. It acts as a hub between universities, institutions, and researchers. These joint efforts in terms of research and financial support bear witness to the two countries’ long history of scientific collaboration. In light of the many ongoing and future projects, this friendship is still going strong. 01. Arbeitsgemeinschaft industrieller Forschungsvereinigungen. 02. Institut de radioastronomie millimétrique. 03. Integrated Plate Boundary Observatory Chile. BREAKing Down Language Bariers Launched in 2008, the International Joint Unit IMMI (Institute for Multilingual & Multimedia Information), which specializes in the development of language technologies, is one of the flagship structuring initiatives of Franco-German collaboration. Associating the France-based LIMSI1 to the Technical University of Aachen and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany, the IMMI specializes in multilingual and multimedia document processing. Renewed in 2012, its mission is to develop world-class language technologies that enable the automatic processing of multilingual data and break down the language barrier associated with globalization. With a staff of 170 people, the IMMI is regarded as the world’s largest research task force on language technologies. It was created around a five-year French program called Quaero, involving more than 30 partners, with a budget of nearly €200 million. This program led to the creation of innovative applications, like the Voxalead News Service, a speech-to-text technology that automatically indexes audio data in nine languages—making keywordbased search possible for speeches and videos. The IMMI is now looking to follow up on the Quaero program, which ended in 2013, and will hopefully lead to the establishment of a European research area in the field of language science and technology. 01. Laboratoire d'informatique pour la mécanique et les sciences de l'ingénieur (CNRS / UPMC / Université Paris-Sud). Contact information: DERCI, Paris. Anne-Marie Brass > anne-marie.brass@cnrs-dir.fr 01 The Plateau de Bure (France) interferometer is the most sensitive observation instrument at millimeter wavelengths. 02 63rd Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting. Science Breakfast with Serge Haroche and David Wineland. 03 Installation of a creepmeter at the Plate Boundary Observatory Chile, which measures tectonic motions to a hundredth of a millimeter along a fault zone. © R. Sch ulte s/Lin dau Nobel Laureate Meeting s 02 03 © P. Victor /GFZ


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