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CLOSE-UP Scanning a Temple livio.deluca@map.archi.fr A photo gallery is available online: www.cnrs.fr/cnrsmagazine 43 WINTER 2015 N° 36 In 2013, researchers from the MAP1 laboratory were able to render a 3D model of the Tholos of Delphi, a one-of-its-kind Greek temple at the base of Mount Parnassus. Using a portable scanner, they made eleven successive scans of the monument, which dates back to 380-370 BC. Able to perform 360° rotations of five minutes each, this scanner emits a laser beam and detects its reflection against surrounding objects to create a point cloud. In this case, the eleven point clouds were then assembled into a single 3D space using post-processing software, subsequently rendering an image of the Tholos with a precision of the order of 2 millimeters. MAP researchers are not new to 3D models of historical monuments as they have already tackled, among others, the Arc of Triomphe in France and the theaters of Pompeii in Italy. 3D scanning of monuments is useful for archiving, cataloguing, and disseminating information to cultural institutions, which can then use it in their research. 1. Modèles et simulations pour l’architecture et le patrimoine (CNRS / MCC) in partnership with the French School at Athens which will soon publish the 3D sculpted decoration of the Tholos, under the direction of Philippe Jockey from the Centre Camille Jullian (CNRS / Aix-Marseille Université / Ministère de la Culture). BY MATTHIEU RAVAUD © D. LO BUGLIO/CNRS PHOTOTHÈQUE/MAP


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